our pandemic summer project? Staying safe and building a lego wheelchair ramp

It’s been a good, long while. I’m happy to report that we’ve been (so far) successful in staying home and staying safe from COVID-19. We’ve made significant changes to our daily lives in order to help protect my darling. Our circle of visitors is limited to a literal handful of people who are equally diligent about protecting against the transmission of this virus.

As you can imagine, it’s been challenging being cooped up for us as adults – and our littles have had to make major adjustments themselves. God bless them – they are both such blessings to us – but life is almost at a standstill.

Months ago, before the pandemic, I came across a video of a news story about a woman they named, “LEGO grandma” – this woman and her husband worked together to build LEGO wheelchair ramps for the businesses in their hometown (which was somewhere in Europe). I showed it to my darling and we both watched in awe as they told their story and built the ramps. Darling laughed and suggested that we could use the eleventimillion LEGO pieces lying around our house to build one for him. I heard him, but this project would take months and I wasn’t sure we had enough of the right pieces.

One of the first “tidying” projects the kids were responsible for when school let out was to reorganize their play room (LEGO room) area. It looked like a medium-sized hippo had bashed around in that room. The LEGO pieces, and other toys, were everywhere – it was almost declared a Superfund site.

As they were cleaning that area up, I began looking into what we would need to build a LEGO wheelchair ramp and we ordered some LEGO plates – large, square, flat pieces. And so began the journey to build a LEGO wheelchair ramp – and we’re so close!

Since then, the kids have filtered through every piece of LEGO they own to see if it could be used for “daddy’s LEGO ramp.” They’ve also worked diligently to help piece this wheelchair ramp together piece-by-piece. They’re both so excited for him to use it, and for them to be able to say that they’ve built this for him. Countless hours have been spent building, and rebuilding this ramp – and the best part is, they love to do it and it’s helped to pass the long summer hours that would have been spent at camps or with friends.

Despite the fact that we had eleventimillion pieces, we’ve still needed to get additional pieces to help with the project. Once our prototype is complete, we’re going to decide whether we want to glue the pieces down or if we’ll have it cast in Epoxy (a friend of ours offered to help with this complicated process.)

We also have a neighbor who could benefit from having one and if we have enough pieces, we’ll be building one for her too. ❤

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Wife, mother, writer, and caregiver. If you're here for support and caregiving life hacks, you've come to the right place.

2 thoughts on “our pandemic summer project? Staying safe and building a lego wheelchair ramp

  1. Hi,
    We are the Ginsburg family and we were touched with your story on the news last night about building LEGO ramps for your father and neighbor. We would be honored to donate our legos to you, for your special cause. My son, Max is almost 16 yrs old and we have 14 plastic bins tucked away that have not been opened since 4th grade. If you have an interest, please let us know and we will find a way to deliver them to you and your sweet family. Thinking of you and your very special cause. Deborah Ginsburg

    Deborah Ginsburg cell (713) 899-0201
    Dginsburg2@gmail.com
    Max Ginsburg Cell (832) 840-1670
    mwginsburg04@gmail.com

    Like

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